ARCHIVED - Office of the Correctional
Investigator

2007-2008
Estimates

A Report on Plans and Priorities

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Approved

______________________________________

The Honourable Stockwell Day, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety
(Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness)


TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION I: AGENCY OVERVIEW

1.1 Correctional Investigator's Message
1.2 Management Representation Statement
1.3 Program Activity Architecture (PAA)
1.4 Summary Information
1.5 Agency Priorities by Strategic Outcome
1.6 Agency Plans and Priorities

SECTION II: ANALYSIS OF PROGRAM ACTIVITY BY STRATEGIC OUTCOME

2.1 OCI Logic Model

SECTION III: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

3.1 Organization Information
3.2 Recent Improvements
3.3 Organization Chart
3.4 Agency Planned Spending and Full Time Equivalents
3.5 Departmental Links to Government of Canada Outcome Areas
3.6 Voted and Statutory Items
3.7 Services Received Without Charge

SECTION IV: OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST

4.1 Government On-Line Information
4.2 Statutes and Regulations
4.3 Reports
4.4 References


Section I: Agency Overview

1.1 Correctional Investigator's Message

As Canada's federal prison Ombudsman offering independent oversight of federal Corrections, the Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI) contributes to public safety and the promotion of human rights by providing independent and timely review of offender complaints. The OCI makes recommendations that assist in the development and maintenance of an accountable federal correctional system that is fair, humane and effective. In order to achieve this result for Canadians, the OCI monitors and investigates the acts, omissions, decisions and recommendations of the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), so that CSC carries out its statutory mandate in compliance not only with its own policies and procedures, but also with its domestic and international legal and human rights obligations.

Since its creation in 1973, the OCI has been an important part of safeguarding the rights of offenders and in making Canada a safer place. Public safety is enhanced by ensuring that offenders are treated fairly, provided the necessary assistance to become law-abiding citizens, and safely reintegrated into society in a timely and supported fashion.

Independent prison oversight is critical to accountability in a democratic society. Prisons are by nature closed institutions, often far from the public eye, where one group of people has considerable power over another. However well prisons are run, the potential for abuse is always present. For more than 33 years, the OCI has played a vital role providing independent oversight and objective investigations of offender complaints as well as making recommendations to address systemic issues to improve Canada's prison system, and ultimately public safety.

In November 2006, after more than two and half years of auditing work, the Auditor General (AG, Chapter 11) tabled a report which alleged improprieties by a previous Correctional Investigator. The audit period covered between 1998/99 and 2003/04. Upon my appointment in April, 2004, I was briefed about the ongoing review and audit of the AG, and moved quickly to review and strengthen the Office's governance, financial management, human resources policies, and performance measurement and reporting. A detailed list of improvements is included in section 3.2 of this report. When the AG Report was tabled, I acted promptly and decisively to address a number of concerns, including initiating the process to recover money as recommended in the audit report.

Working with the Treasury Board Secretariat, I secured the services of a consultant who was assigned the role of interim Senior Financial Officer for the Office. His duties also included the review the Office's new financial and human resources management procedures and advised if there is anything more that can be done to address the recommendations of the AG and ensure compliance with Treasury Board policies. Finally, the Office entered into a new agreement which details roles and responsibilities from the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness as its service provider for financial and human resources management.

The Office will continue to support Central Agencies in the development and application of any government-wide policy or procedural change aimed at strengthening agency accountability frameworks. The OCI is committed to comply with applicable legislation and TB policies, and demonstrate accountability and transparency in its management of financial and human resource management. Sound management practices will remain a core priority for the OCI in all aspects of its operations.

The next fiscal year promises once again to be a very challenging one for the OCI. The number and level of complexity of offender complaints continue to increase. Workload pressures constantly test our ability to meet our legislative mandate. As indicated in my last Annual Report 2005/06, addressing individual offender complaints at the institutional level remains this Office's major strength. However, the OCI's greatest challenge has been its limited ability to cause the CSC to reasonably address systemic issues and to ensure that CSC's operations fully comply with its legislative and policy framework.

Limited gains have been made on several key systemic issues identified by the OCI in recent years, including addressing gaps in mental health services, removing systemic barriers that prevent timely safe reintegration of Aboriginal offenders into the community, and ensuring the delivery of appropriate programs and services to women offenders. Moreover, over the last decade, the OCI has become increasingly concerned about the high number of deaths and self-inflicted injuries in federal institutions. In my last annual report, I stated that my Office was especially concerned about the number of similar recommendations made year after year by CSC's national investigations, provincial coroners, and medical examiners. I also expressed concern about the ability of CSC to implement these recommendations on a national level, and undertook to conduct a comprehensive review of reports and recommendations dealing with deaths in custody and other matters.

In the next fiscal year, the OCI will continue to pursue resolution of these key areas of focus and the many other systemic issues identified in my last annual report. The OCI will continue to be committed to foster a collaborative, respectful and productive relationship with the CSC, and to work diligently to carry out its challenging mandate with the highest degree of professionalism.



Howard Sapers
Correctional Investigator

1.2 Management Representation Statement

I submit for tabling in Parliament, the 2007-2008 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Office of the Correctional Investigator.

This document has been prepared based on the reporting principles contained in the Guide for the Preparation of Part III of the 2007-2008 Estimates: Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports:

It adheres to the specific reporting requirements outlined in the Treasury Board Secretariat guidance;
  • It is based on the department's approved Strategic Outcomes and Program Activity Architecture that were approved by the Treasury Board;
  • It presents consistent, comprehensive, balanced and reliable information;
  • It provides a basis of accountability for the results achieved with the resources and authorities entrusted to it; and
  • It reports finances based on approved planned spending numbers from the Treasury Board Secretariat in the RPP.
Name: _____________________________________

Title: Correctional Investigator of Canada

1.3 Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

Below is the OCI's Program Activity Architecture, as presented in our 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

Strategic Outcome
Expected Results
Performance Indicators
The problems of offenders in the federal correctional system are identified and addressed in a timely and reasonable fashion
 
 
Program Activity
Expected Results
Performance Indicators
Oversight of correctional operations
· The Correctional Service will improve its compliance with regard to Law, policy and procedures, fairness and its previous undertakings
· OCI interventions and recommendations, will have an impact (attribution), on CSC performance with regard to the resolution of offender problems
· Degree of CSC compliance with Law, policy and procedures, fairness and its previous undertakings
· Number of OCI interventions and recommendations with impact (attribution) on CSC performance
Program Sub-Activity
Expected Results
Performance Indicators
Investigate and resolve individual offender issues
· Individual offender complaints are reasonably addressed by the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) and corrective action is taken (when necessary)
· Number of individual offender complaints where CSC has taken corrective action
Investigate, monitor and resolve systemic offender issues (Mental Health is an area of special interest)
· Systemic issues will be acknowledged by CSC and corrective action taken.
· Number of acknowledged systemic issues, where corrective action has been taken
Monitor, evaluate and provide representations on CSC management of mandated issues (s.19 investigations and Use of Force incidents)
· Increased thoroughness, objectivity and timeliness of the Correctional Service of Canada's investigative process regarding s.19 Investigations and Use of Force incidents
· Number of s.19 Investigations Reports and Use of Force Incident Reports with problems
Investigate, resolve and provide leadership on specifically identified issues (e.g. Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders)
· Improvement in CSC performance with regard to specific issues related to Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders
· Number of complaints received by OCI from Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders and where CSC has taken corrective action
· Number of Women Offender specific and Aboriginal Offender specific OCI “areas of special concern” with improved CSC performance statistics
· % of complaints received by OCI in these “areas of special concern”, wherein CSC has taken corrective action

1.4 Summary Information

Reason for Existence

The Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI) provides Canadians with timely, independent, thorough and objective monitoring of their federal correctional system to ensure that it remains safe, secure, fair, equitable, humane, reasonable and effective. Essentially, its oversight role is to ensure that the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) carries out its statutory mandate in compliance with its domestic and international legal and human rights obligations.

Financial Resources (in thousands of $)

2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
3,132
3,132
3,132

 

Human Resources (FTE's)

2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
22
22
22

1.5 Agency Priorities by Strategic Outcome

The Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI) is a federal micro-agency. It has only one Program Activity (PA), that is the “Oversight of Correctional Operations” and only one Strategic Outcome. The OCI's priorities revolve around its legislative mandate and accordingly, are the agency's program sub-activities.

  Planned Spending (in thousands $)
  2007-08 2008-09 2009-10
Strategic Outcome:
The problems of offenders in the federal correctional system are identified and addressed in a timely and reasonable fashion
Priorities Type Expected Results      
1. Investigate and resolve individual offender issues Ongoing Individual offender complaints are reasonably addressed by the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) and corrective action is taken (when necessary) 1,313 1,313 1,313
2. Investigate, monitor and resolve systemic offender issues (Mental Health is an area of special interest) Ongoing Systemic issues will be acknowledged by CSC and corrective action taken. 768 768 768
3. Monitor, evaluate and provide representations on CSC management of mandated issues (s.19 investigations and Use of Force incidents) Ongoing Increased thoroughness, objectivity and timeliness of the Correctional Service of Canada's investigative process regarding s.19 Investigations and Use of Force incidents 211 211 211
4. Investigate, resolve and provide leadership on specifically identified issues
(e.g. Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders)
Ongoing Improvement in CSC performance with regard to specific issues related to Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders 320 320 320

1.6 Agency Plans and Priorities

The Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI) is largely funded through operating expenditures and has the authority to spend revenue received during the year.

The primary legislative mandate of the OCI is to provide Canadians with independent investigation of the individual and systemic problems encountered by federal offenders as a result of decisions, recommendations, acts or omissions by the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC). Section 19 of its enabling legislation, the Corrections and Conditional Release Act also requires that it reviews all CSC Investigations convened following the death of or serious bodily injury to an offender. The OCI is also engaged in similar monitoring of all interventions by Institutional Emergency Response Teams (IERTs).

The maintaining of an independent and objective review process within a correctional environment where the Office has virtually no control over either the number of complaints or the extent of the required investigations presents a number of unique challenges. First, our portfolio is national in scope and offers, by the sheer number and complexity of issues, an endless supply of difficulties, opportunities and shifting priorities. Our client base and network of stakeholders are dispersed in a large number of often geographically remote locations throughout Canada. Second, the resolution of disputes in an environment traditionally closed to public scrutiny with an understandably high level of mistrust between correctional officials and offenders, requires that the Office not only be, but be seen to be independent of both the Correctional Service and the Department. Third, given that the authority of the Office rests with its power of persuasion and public reporting rather than enforceable recommendations, it is imperative that appropriate administrative and political mechanisms be available to ensure that reasonable, fair, timely, thorough and humane action is taken on the findings made by the OCI.

The OCI does not foresee a decline in either the overall demand for services or in the complexity of the issues the OCI is called upon to address. The environment in which the OCI operates continue to be extremely challenging. Moving forward requires not only innovative and dedicated services, but also sound risk management, knowledge-driven decision-making, rigorous stewardship, clear accountabilities and responsible spending.

The OCI's Program Activity (PA) is the “Oversight of Correctional Operations” and its Strategic Outcome (SO) is “the problems of offenders in the federal correctional system are identified and resolved in a timely and reasonable fashion”. Our PAA-related plans and priorities correspond to our four Program Sub-Activities:

Priority 1

Investigate and resolve individual offender issues

The role of the Correctional Investigator is to be an ombudsman for federal offenders. The primary function of the Office is to investigate and bring resolution to individual offender complaints. The vast majority of the concerns raised on complaints are addressed by OCI at the institutional level through direct contact and communications with offenders and CSC staff.

Plans

The OCI will visit all institutions, according to its frequency schedule/institutional security level. Its investigative staff will then interview offenders (and those acting on their behalf) and will maintain accessibility through regular correspondence, e-mail and telephone.

OCI investigators will address all offender issues in a timely fashion; prioritizing those they consider being of an urgent nature. In so doing, they investigate concerns and make recommendations to CSC officials at all levels, while always striving to secure resolution at the lowest possible organizational level.

Moreover, the OCI's investigative staff will ensure, through follow-up and impact analysis, that CSC's response to its queries and recommendations be timely, fair, thorough, equitable, reasonable and effective.

Finally the OCI will exercise, where appropriate, its prerogative to investigate, on its own initiative, any issue affecting one or more offenders.

Priority 2

Investigate, monitor and resolve systemic offender issues

While the primary role of the Office of the Correctional Investigator is to investigate and resolve complaints from individual offenders, it has, as well, the responsibility to review and make recommendations on the Correctional Service of Canada's policies and procedures associated with the areas of individual complaints to ensure that systemic areas of concern are identified and appropriately addressed.

Plans

Prior to each institutional visit, the OCI investigator will monitor, through a review and comparative analysis of CSC's own statistics, the institution's performance in the OCI's Areas of Concern (long-standing systemic areas of OCI concern, that are closely linked to an offender's rights and liberty issues, such as timely conditional release consideration and effective internal redress).

During the visit, the OCI investigator will raise any shortcomings with the Warden and where appropriate will make recommendations. The implementation of those recommendations will be monitored through a review of the institution's performance prior to the next visit, with the OCI always having the option of addressing its concerns at the regional or national level of CSC.

During each institutional visit, OCI investigative staff will also meet with the Inmate Committee and where appropriate, with other offender groups such as Native Brotherhoods and Sisterhoods. Investigators will then hold timely discussions with CSC authorities and where appropriate, make recommendations related to the systemic issues raised by these groups; striving to achieve resolution at the lowest possible organizational level.

As in the case of individual offender concerns, OCI investigative staff will subsequently monitor and evaluate, through follow-up and impact analysis, the timeliness and overall quality of CSC's response.

Priority 3

Monitor, evaluate, and provide representations on CSC's management of mandated issues (s.19 investigations and Use of Force incidents)

Section 19 of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act implicitly requires that the Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI) review all investigations conducted by the Correctional Service of Canada following the death or serious bodily injury to an inmate. The OCI is also engaged in similar monitoring of interventions (Use of Force) by Institutional Emergency Response Teams (IERTs).

Plans

The OCI Coordinator of s.19 investigation and Use of Force Issues, with the assistance of an analyst, will review CSC s.19 investigations and CSC reports inclusive of videotapes related to Use of Force incidents, as per OCI's standardized review procedure and timeliness benchmarks. Initially determined will be CSC's compliance with the agreed upon timeliness for providing the OCI with all the required s.19 investigation report. Subsequently, the OCI's review will focus on identifying instances of CSC non-compliance within the law and its own policy regarding the Use of Force or flaws in CSC s.19 investigative reports. Finally, the Coordinator will make representations and/or recommendations to CSC officials at the appropriate level and monitor and evaluate, through follow-up and impact analysis, the timeliness and overall quality of CSC's response.

Priority 4

Investigate, resolve and provide leadership on specifically identified issues (Women and Aboriginal Offenders, and Mental Health)

The Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI) conducts specialized investigations and attempts to resolve the issues raised by or on behalf of Women and Aboriginal Offenders. In cooperation with its partners, both governmental and non-governmental, it provides observations, advice, and direction to the Correctional Service of Canada and others regarding these issues.

Plans

Under the guidance of the Coordinators of Women Offender Issues and Aboriginal Offender Issues, OCI investigators will deal, in essentially the same manner as described above, with individual and systemic issues brought to their attention by Women and Aboriginal Offenders.

OCI investigators will also meet, during each visit with Native Brotherhoods and Sisterhoods and where appropriate, with institutional Elders, Native Liaison Officers and Regional Elder Advisory Committees.

Moreover, OCI coordinators will focus on a number of issues which are specific to or which continue to have considerably more impact on those sub-groups than on the general offender population.

Finally, both Coordinators (Aboriginal Issues and Women Issues) will assume the provision of a national leadership role on key issues affecting their respective areas of responsibility.

They will prioritize, within their strategic planning process, the development of collaborative and mutually beneficial working relationships with groups and associations in the public and non-governmental sectors, which are involved in the betterment of corrections for Women and Aboriginal Offenders.

Mental Health Services will remain an area of special interest. Despite not having received full funding, the OCI will increase its outreach efforts towards offenders suffering from mental health issues within its current fiscal envelop. It will also focus its monitoring and investigative efforts of Correctional Services of Canada (CSC), in the Mental Health component of the correctional treatment it offers to incarcerated Canadians.

The OCI will pursue its dialogue with CSC Officials, at all levels, on the topics of assessment, access to, and quality of CSC Mental Health Services both within institutions and community settings. The situation of Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders, in that regard will be the subject of particular attention.

In practical terms, the Directors of Investigations will be required to champion the mental health issues and to ensure that there is a continued focus, by the Investigators, on the identified mental health issues. They will be responsible for identifying patterns of issues, pursuing these at the regional level and ensuring that the OCI has a picture of the entire system, not just their individual regions.

Each Investigator will be required to monitor identified mental health related issues at each of the medium and maximum security sites for which they are responsible. These identified issues become part of the OCI Areas of Focus, reportable semi-annually. Each Investigator is also responsible for the management of individual mental health related complaints, from receipt to conclusion, as per current practice; for relationship building with Mental Health Teams/professionals at sites and for the critical sharing of information with OCI colleagues and Directors of Investigations.

Section II: Analysis of Program Activity by Strategic Outcome

The OCI's only Strategic Outcome (SO) is “The problems of offenders in the federal correctional system are identified and resolved in a timely fashion”. Its only Program Activity (PA) is the “Oversight of Correctional Operations”, which regroups the four OCI Priorities/Program Sub-Activities described above in Section 1.3.

As the chart below illustrates, each expected result at the Program Activity (PA) and Program Sub-Activity level is expressed and should be perceived conceptually as a link in the results chain leading to the Strategic Outcome.

Strategic Outcome
Expected Results
The problems of offenders in the federal correctional system are identified and addressed in a timely and reasonable fashion
 
Program Activity
Expected Results
Oversight of correctional operations
· The Correctional Service will improve its compliance with regard to Law, policy and procedures, fairness and its previous undertakings
· OCI interventions and recommendations, will have an impact (attribution), on CSC performance with regard to the resolution of offender problems
Program Sub-Activity
Expected Results
Investigate and resolve individual offender issues
· Individual offender complaints are reasonably addressed by the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) and corrective action is taken (when necessary)
Investigate, monitor and resolve systemic offender issues
· CSC promptly and effectively respond to the OCI observations and recommendations on systemic areas of offender concern.
Monitor, evaluate and provide representations on CSC management of mandated issues (s.19 investigations and Use of Force incidents)
· Increased thoroughness, objectivity and timeliness of the Correctional Service of Canada's investigative process regarding s.19 Investigations and Use of Force incidents
Investigate, resolve and provide leadership on specifically identified issues (e.g. Women offenders, Aboriginal offenders, mental health issues)
· Improvement in CSC performance with regard to specific issues related to Women offenders, Aboriginal offenders and mental health issues

Another avenue for understanding the linkage between our agency's Program Activity (PA), Sub-activities/Priorities and the achievement of its expected results and Strategic Outcome (SO) resides in the revised OCI Logic Model presented below:

2.1 OCI Logic Model

2.1 Logic Model

The chart below outlines the OCI's revised performance measurement strategy and financial and human resources requirements (except for corporate services) during the current planning cycle.

Program Activity: Oversight of Correctional Operations

Expected Results (M)
Indicators
Data Source(s)/
Frequency
Target
(March 31, 2008)
Effective Date for Actual Value
Comments
The Correctional Service will improve its compliance with regard to Law, policy and procedures, fairness undertakings
Degree of CSC compliance with Law, policy and procedures, fairness and previous undertakings
DATIS/Semi-Annual/RADAR
5 % increase in degree of compliance
October 1, 2007
OCI interventions and recommenda-
tions will have an impact attribution on CSC performance with regard to the resolution of offender problems
Number of OCI interventions and recommenda-
tions with impact (attribution) on CSC performance
DATIS/
Semi-Annual
4 % increase in % of interventions with significant impact and 6 % decrease in % of interventions with a negligible impact
October 1, 2007
Actual degree of CSC compliance will be calculated on basis of # recommend-
ations (with findings) and # of interventions with significant impact

 

Program Sub-Activity: Investigate and resolve individual offender issues

Expected Results (M)
Indicators
Data Source(s)/
Frequency
Target
(March 31, 2008)
Effective Date for Actual Value
Comments
Individual offender complaints are reasonably addressed by the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) and corrective action is taken when necessary
Number of individual offender complaints where CSC has taken corrective action
DATIS/Semi-Annual/RADAR
5 % increase in % of individual offender contacts with recommenda-tions or with significant impact
October 1, 2007
 

 

Program Sub-Activity: Monitor, evaluate and provide representations on CSC management of mandated issues (s.19 investigations and Use of Force incidents)

Expected Results (M)
Indicators
Data Source(s)/
Frequency
Target
(March 31, 2008)
Effective Date for Actual Value
Comments
Increased thoroughness, objectivity and timeliness of the CSC's investigative process regarding s.19 Investigations and Use of Force incidents
Number of s.19 Investigation Reports with problems and Use of Force Incident Reports with problems
DATIS/Semi-Annual
10% decrease in number of reports with problems
October 1, 2007
 

 

Program Sub-Activity: Investigate, resolve and provide leadership on specifically identified issues ( e.g. Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders)

Expected Results (M)
Indicators
Data Source(s)/
Frequency
Target
(March 31, 2008)
Effective Date for Actual Value
Comments
Improvement in CSC performance with regard to specific issues related to Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders
Number of complaints received by OCI from Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders, wherein CSC has taken corrective action
DATIS/
Semi-Annual
4% increase in % of complaints actionned by CSC
October 1, 2007
Number of Women Offender specific and Aboriginal Offender specific OCI “areas of special interest” with improved CSC performance statistics
CSC Databases (RADAR and Discoverer)/

Semi-Annual
2% improvement in CSC performance statistics
October 1, 2007
Number of complaints received by OCI in these “areas of special interest”, wherein CSC has taken corrective action
DATIS/
Semi-Annual
4% increase in complaints actionned by CSC
October 1, 2007
“Areas of special interest: for 2005-2006 for Women & Aboriginals are:

- Condition release rates (early vs. statutory)
- Temporary absences & work release
- Inmate count in max unit
- Use of grievance system

Aboriginals only:
Security classification, Segregation, Waivers/ Postponements/ Withdrawals

 

Program Sub-Activity: Investigate and resolve individual offender issues

Outputs
Indicators
Data Source(s)/
Frequency
Target
(March 31, 2008)
Effective Date for Actual Value
Comments
OCI Interventions and Recommenda-
tions (re: Individual offender complaints)
Number of individual offender related interventions with significant impact and recommenda-
tions
DATIS/Semi-Annual
5 % increase in % OCI interventions with significant impact and recommenda-
tions
October 1, 2007
Disposition of contacts
Delay between date of OCI contact by offender and OCI date of disposition
DATIS/Semi-Annual
90% of internal response, 85% of inquiries and 80% of investigations meet OCI timeliness standards
October 1, 2007
OCI Timeliness
Internal Response: 5 days

Inquiry: 15 days

Investigation: 45 days
Information or referral
Number of information given and referral dispositions
DATIS/Semi-Annual
5 % increase in number of contacts disposed with the provision of information given referral
October 1, 2007
 

 

Program Sub-Activity: Investigate, monitor and resolve systemic offender issues

Outputs
Indicators
Data Source(s)/
Frequency
Target
(March 31, 2008)
Effective Date for Actual Value
Comments
OCI Interventions and Recommendations related to systemic issues
Identification of systemic issues related to offender complaints
DATIS/Semi-Annual
CSC promptly and constructively respond to the OCI observations and recommenda-tions on systemic areas of offender concern
October 1, 2007
Timeliness of CSC's responses
Quality of CSC's responses in addressing systemic issues

 

Program Sub-Activity: Monitor, evaluate and provide representations on CSC management of mandated issues (s.19 investigations and Use of Force incidents)

Outputs
Indicators
Data Source(s)/
Frequency
Target
(March 31, 2008)
Effective Date for Actual Value
Comments
Reviews of CSC s.19 and Use of Force reports
Degree of compliance with OCI timeliness standards
DATIS/Semi-Annual
100% compliance
October 1, 2007
OCI timeliness standards

Use of Force:
Initial screening 5 working days
Second screening/full review 45 working days

s.19 Review:
20 working days

 

Program Sub-Activity: Investigate, resolve and provide leadership on specifically identified issues ( e.g. Women Offenders and Aboriginal Offenders)

Outputs
Indicators
Data Source(s)/
Frequency
Target
(March 31, 2008)
Effective Date for Actual Value
Comments
OCI interventions/
recommenda-
tions
Number of Women Offender and Aboriginal Offender related OCI interventions with significant impact and recommenda-
tions
DATIS/Semi-Annual
2% increase in % of OCI interventions with significant impact and recommenda-
tions
October 1, 2007
Number of OCI interventions with significant impact and recommenda-
tions in Women and Aboriginal Offender related “special areas of interest”
DATIS/Semi-Annual
2% decrease in number of complaints received by Aboriginal and Women in “areas of concern”
October 1, 2007
 

Section III: Supplementary Information

3.1 Organization Information

Ultimately, the Correctional Investigator is responsible for all aspects of the OCI's performance vis-à-vis its strategic outcome and in terms of its accountability to Canadians, Parliament and central agencies.

He is supported in that role by the Executive Director, whose primary responsibility is to manage the Office's investigative process. Assisting him are two Directors of Investigations, to whom report directly all senior investigators and investigators. They are, in turn, supported in their activities, by four intake officers from the Corporate Services and Planning Sector.

Also supervised by the Executive Director are the three coordinators of specialized investigative services 1) Aboriginal Offender Issues, 2) Women Offender Issues, 3) s.19 Investigations and Use of Force. Given the complexity and broad nature of his mandate, the third coordinator is assisted in his role by an analyst. The Executive Director and all the actors in the investigative process benefit from the advice of the OCI's Senior Policy Advisor and Counsel.

Finally, the Coordinator of Corporate Services and Planning, assisted by the Chief of Administrative Services and three intake officers, is responsible for the efficient functioning of the OCI on a day-to-day basis. Provided is the entire range of corporate and administrative services, notably financial administration, procurement, informatics, internal audit, and reporting to Parliament and central agencies.

3.2 Recent Improvements in Governance, Financial Management and Accountability, Human Resources Management, and Performance Measurement and Reporting

Presented below are the key initiatives adopted by the current Correctional Investigator since his appointment in 2004 which are designed to strengthen governance, financial management and accountability, human resources management, and performance measurement and reporting.

Governance

  • Engaged the services of management consultants to advise and assist on the implementation of financial and human resources activities
  • Adopted a formal Governance Structure
  • Created an Internal Audit Committee
  • Adopted the Treasury Board Secretariat Values and Ethics Code for the Public Service as the Code of Conduct for the Office of the Correctional Investigator

Financial Management and Accountability

  • Formally designated a Senior Financial Officer (SFO)
  • Developed and implemented new Operations & Maintenance (O&M) expenditure control system, inclusive of the training in the System applications and Products in Data Processing (SAP) required by employees
  • Assumed responsibility for the Salary Management System (SMS) and ensured all employees received appropriate training from the Comptrollership of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC)
  • Implemented appropriate procedures to ensure that practices and policy requirements are met in regard to travel, hospitality and other expenses
  • Complied with Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) Informal Disclosure directives with regard to Senior Management Travel, Hospitality Expenditures and Reclassification
  • Closely and successfully cooperated with Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) officials and consultants in the Management Accountability Framework (MAF) exercise
  • Directed the creation of an ATIP request tracking system and retained the services of an expert consultant to manage ATIP processing; resulting in the elimination of request backlogs and complaints from the Offices of the Privacy and Information Commissioners

Human Resources Management

  • Implemented new Public Service Employment Act, inclusive of information sessions for employees. A Staffing Management Accountability Framework (SMAF) was developed and implemented.
  • Ensured all employees with delegated authority in the area of Human Resources Management (HRM) completed the training prescribed by the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency (PSHRMAC)
  • Ensured Senior Managers received training on Values in Staffing, Informal Conflict Management, Leadership and Managing Public funds
  • Established the practice of a formal performance appraisal for the position of Executive Director
  • Retained a firm of experts consultants to evaluate human resources requirements and provide advice on optimizing the integration of human and financial resources with operations and corporate priorities
  • Developed and implemented a Corporate Human Resources Plan
  • Cooperated with Commissioner of Official Languages to ensure compliance with linguistic profile requirements
  • The OCI and PSEPC have signed an MOU that outlines each organization's role and responsibilities, as well as the Finance, HR, IM/IT and Security services to be provided
  • Implemented an Informal Conflict Management System (ICMS) in conjunction with Justice Canada
  • Created a Workplace and Safety Committee co-chaired by one representative from management and another from the group of non-management employees

Performance Measurement and Reporting

  • Revised Integrated Planning Framework and Performance Measurement Strategy to align with Treasury Board's Program Activity Architecture (PAA) requirements
  • Completed major revision of the OCI Data and Tracking Information System (DATIS) to reflect changes in internal business processes and increase accuracy and completeness in performance measurement and reporting
  • Undertook review of Information Management practices to improve access for decision making and reporting to central agencies

3.3 Organization Chart

Organization Chart

3.4 Agency Planned Spending and Full Time Equivalents

($ thousands) Forecast
Spending
2006-2007
Planned Spending
2007-2008
Planned Spending
2008-2009
Planned Spending
2009-2010
Oversight of Correctional Operations        
Budgetary Main Estimates (gross) 3,114 3,132 3,132 3,132
Total Main Estimates 3,114 3,132 3,132 3,132
Supplementary Estimates        
Carry Forward 2005-2006 128 --- --- ---
Other        
Collective Bargaining Adjustments 18      
Total Adjustments 146 --- --- ---
Total Planned Spending 3,260 3,132 3,132 3,132
 
Total Planned Spending 3,260 3,132 3,132 3,132
Plus: Cost of services received with charge 411 394 394 394
Total Departmental Spending 3,671 3,508 3,508 3,508
         
Full-time Equivalents 22 22 22 22

3.5 Departmental Links to Government of Canada Outcome Areas

The Office of the Correctional Investigator contributes to safe and secure communities.

2007-2008
Strategic Outcome : The problems of offenders in the federal correctional system are identified and addressed in a timely and reasonable fashion
($ thousands) Budgetary    
Program Activity Operating Gross Net Total Main Estimates Total Planned Spending
Oversight of Correctional Operations 2,650 2,650 2,650 2,650 2,650
Corporate Services 482 482 482 482 482
Total 3,132 3,132 3,132 3,132 3,132

3.6 Voted and Statutory Items ($ thousands)

Vote or Statutory Item   2007-2008
Main Estimates
2006-2007
Main Estimates
40 Program expenditures 2,773 2,750
(S) Contributions to employee benefit plans 359 364
  Total Agency 3,132 3,114

3.7 Services Received Without Charge

($ thousands) 2007-2008
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada 258
Contributions covering the employer's share of employees' insurance premiums and expenditures paid by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (excluding revolving funds) 136
Total 2006-2007 Services received without charge 394

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

4.1 Government On-Line Information

Website: http://www.oci-bec.gc.ca
Email: org@oci-bec.gc.ca

4.2 Statutes and Regulations

Corrections and Conditional Release Act, Part III

4.3 Reports

4.4 References

Name
Title
Address
Tel. No.
Fax No.
Howard Sapers
Correctional Investigator
P.O. Box 3421
Station "D"
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 6L4
(613) 990-2689
(613) 990-9091
Ed McIsaac
Executive
Director
P.O. Box 3421
Station "D"
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 6L4
(613) 990-2691
(613) 990-9091
Mary-Ann Ruedl
A/Chief Corporate Services
P.O. Box 3421
Station "D"
Ottawa, Ontario
K1P 6L4
(613) 990-2694
(613) 990-9091